Pig (2021)

When I first saw the trailer for Nicolas Cage‘s newest film I felt immediately smitten. This isn’t entirely shocking given my appreciation for most of what he does (on all levels of the Cage, and there’s a rich scale at play), but what was unexpected was just how much I would ultimately end up loving Michael Sarnoski‘s Pig-a beautiful, little film.

Nicolas Cage plays Rob a truffle farmer (and retired chef) who spends his time in the woods of Oregon with his truffle pig. It’s a simple life, away from people -with very little interactions- but one that he seems comfortable in. When he’s attacked and his beloved pig taken, he begins the quest to find and get his animal back.

source: Neon

If you’re like me you are probably imagining Cage channeling some serious Neeson vibes from Taken, menacingly threatening those who come between him and his pig. Or a John Wick like revenge plot of epic proportions. In many ways that could have been this movie, and I may have been game for that, but, honestly, I’m so very glad that it wasn’t.

Instead, we are given a deeply moving, heartbreaking meditation on loss.

“We don’t get a lot of things to really care about.”

Within his quest to find his pig he is aided by Amir (Alex Wolff) his young, at first impression- seemingly arrogant connection to the world, who is his tether to Portland. He’s really his closest companion to society, but also in deciphering the mystery of his recent loss. While at first their relationship seems situational, it is really a big strength within the film that boasts an unexpected level of tenderness that’s explored throughout. One that’s relatable, and like most of the movie: surprisingly poignant.

As Amir helps Rob in figuring out what’s happened it leads them to Amir’s own father Marcus (Adam Arkin), a stoic but formidable figure, who ends up being (in both of their lives) a piece towards understanding. Very little in Pig is wasteful, with most dialogue and plot direction providing ample ammunition for a finale that might seem underwhelming, but is ultimately heart-rending.

source: Neon
source: Neon

As a former culinary artist, Rob still has a real way, a sort of language, with food, and there’s one scene that feels somehow both like an excellent cooking special and a form of therapy. Essentially, Pig at a glance.

Pig embraces its simplicity, bringing forth a witty, dramatic and offbeat screenplay (by Michael Sarnoski, with a story from Sarnoski and Vanessa Block) that works as a character study and also an elegant, subtle one of love. The love of food, as well as the love that never fades, even when you lose someone, and the love of a companionship (whatever that is). Love…is love. While it is a compelling narrative this doesn’t rely on uncovering the mystery (though we want/need to know where the pig is!!) as much as it is about understanding the connections guiding us throughout the film.

I appreciate the fact that Cage‘s character remains in the same clothing, bloodied and dirty, the entire film, because that aspect just isn’t important. He’s so spectacular here, so raw and driven, that even when he isn’t saying much at all, it makes for a riveting performance. He plays Rob with a quiet brooding, someone who has internalized his pain and throughout the film, slowly shakes the grip of his memories. There’s still a randomness, an absurdity to his character, but it only makes his portrayal that much more inviting.

As I alluded to previously but I will reiterate again: this is not like any of Cage‘s recent films. If you’re going into this expecting that sort of over the top, wonderfully whacky acting that we’ve become accustomed to, then you’ll be disappointed (though I’m hoping you won’t). In some ways I feel like all his performances recently were really just leading up to this one, and, it’s a relief in some ways. This is a reflective, slow-building that was the best kind of surprise. All three of the main male leads are excellently cast, each with their own paths and moments of redemption and vulnerability.

I was deeply affected by this film. Yep, this is one that can make you misty eyed- so be prepared. If nothing else, I can’t imagine anyone walking away from it without feeling unburdened, in a sense, because there’s a catharsis within this story. Who would have thought from the logline for this film? Not me, but I’m happy to report that Pig is a stand out. It really captures the importance of connection (and of delicious food- not gonna lie). Sarnoski crafts something atmospheric and moody, with moments of levity and individuality. It is a stellar feature debut and I can’t wait to see what he does next.

I don’t say this lightly, but this is Cage’s strongest performances in many years, and one of the best films of 2021 so far. Director/co-writer Michael Sarnoski‘s Pig is captivating and unforgettable.

Pig is currently available to rent on VOD.

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